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Page number:24 
Remarks (internal):This would appear to be predominantly a species of high altitudes in the eastern tropics. The Assam, Sri Lanka and Thailand collections were all from at least 4000 ft, about 1200 m, above sea level and in Sri Lanka Petch (1925) did not find the species at the lower altitude of Peradeniya.
The possible record from Sumatra rests on an illustration by Stomps (1931), a rather poorly reproduced photograph of a young fruit-body removed from its volva, apparently as it was emerging, and evidently preserved in spirit. Though Stomps identified it as Clathrus treubii it is certainly not that species but has a rather robustly constructed receptacle which shows signs of incipient fragmentation in the upper part.
Fischer's (1900) record of C. crispatus from Yucatan, Mexico, is an error. The specimen at Kew on which it was based is C. crispus.
A good account of this species was given by Petch (1925). It closely approaches the hypothetical primitive Clathrus in its massive construction, with very thick spongy-textured arms bearing gleba evenly distributed over their entire inner surface. It differs, however, in having a tendency to elongation of the lower meshes.
The relatively large spores, the tendency of the receptacle to break open from the top and its coloration, pink outside shading to deep red inside, are especially characteristic of the Anthuroid series. The tubes of the receptacle are very irregular and intercommunicate to such a degree that their walls in places are reduced to struts. Petch thought it normal for the receptacle to break open at the top, even before fully expanded and it is interesting that the label of the Thailand specimen states: `collected alive ... it burst open in a few days and a red cone-shaped network protruded and this later broke across centre and inner sides turned outwards'. This feature is shared with the next species.
The very deep surface reticulations of the egg are an interesting specific character. As a result of their mode of development all clathroids have grooves on the surface of the unopened egg, corresponding to the peridial sutures. In C. crispatus the very strongly defined grooves on the unexpanded egg are presumably correlated with thick short sutures and copious gelatinous tissue between them.
The watercolours accompanying Gardner's material at Kew show a more robustly constructed fruit-body than Petch's (1925) published photograph. In one of the former the relatively small (1 cm diameter) perforations and broad arms (2.5 cm) in a receptacle which has broken into two major lobes give a strong impression of the inflorescence of some aroid.
 
Description type:Non-original description 
Description:Clathrus crispatus Thwaites ex Fischer, Denkschr. Schweiz. Ges. Nat. 33: 24 (1893).
Egg globose, up to 7 cm diameter, rooting by a tuft of thick, white, mycelia' strands, strongly tuberculate, the tubercles about 1.5 cm diameter, rounded or flat topped, regularly polygonal on the upper part of the egg, tending to become vertically elongated on the lower part, corresponding to the spaces between the peridial sutures. Peridium rather thick, brownish or yellowish grey, dehiscing irregularly from the apex, often along the suture lines; gelatinous layer rather thick, enlarging to form the inner tissue of the tubercles. Receptacle breaking up as it expands but probably basically ovoid and up to 12 cm high, with up to about 60 meshes; the broken fragments collapse on the ground over an area some 24 cm diameter. Arms pinkish on the outer surface with a red margin, becoming crimson inside, flattened and faintly rugulose outside, strongly ridged within; basal arms 6-8, subtending somewhat elongated meshes which become regularly polygonal above and about 1.5-2 cm diameter; in section flattened-triangular, with base of the triangle outermost, up to 2 cm wide and 1 cm deep. A large triangular inner tube occupies half the area of the section and is frequently fenestrate, the base of the triangle is occupied by one or two rows of irregular small chambers which often intercommunicate and are minutely perforate to the outside of the arm. Gleba evenly distributed over the whole interior of the receptacle, dark olive. Spores bacilloid, slightly greenish, 5-7 x 2.5 µm. Fig. 6.
Type locality: Hautane, Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Aug. 1859, Thwaites.
Distribution. India (Assam), New Guinea, Sri Lanka, ?Sumatra, Taiwan, Thailand.
This would appear to be predominantly a species of high altitudes in the eastern tropics. The Assam, Sri Lanka and Thailand collections were all from at least 4000 ft, about 1200 m, above sea level and in Sri Lanka Petch (1925) did not find the species at the lower altitude of Peradeniya.
Icones: Lloyd, Synops. Known Phall. Fig. 74a (1909), egg only. - Petch, Ann. R. Bot. Gard., Peradeniya 4 Tab. 13 (1908), egg only; 9 Tab. 15, 15a (1925). - ?Stomps, Ber. Deuts. Bot. Ges. 49: 59 Abb. 2 (1931) .
 
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