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 Add this item to the list   803211 Original description
   
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Page number:476 
Remarks (internal):This is the third species, along with Bu. primiregius and Bu. autumniregius, encompassed by Thiers’ (1975) concept of Boletus regius. The latter species, however, turns blue only rarely when cut and has not been verified to occur in North America. Bu. querciregius is most likely to be confused with Bu. autumniregius in that both species fruit in the fall and their ranges overlap. Bu. querciregius differs in its mycorrhizal host, shorter spores with smaller Q ratio, and also by its different pileus color: red or dull red or even orange-red, sometimes blotched with yellow before fading to pinkish brown, tan or yellowish. Bu. querciregius also can be mistaken for Bu. persolidus (see comments under that species for a comparison). Some collections of Bu. querciregius feature a beautiful blush of red over the lower portion of the stipe as shown in color plate 133 of Arora (1986), but this is not a consistent character. It is worth noting that Arora11097 grew under the same tree as the specimens Arora (1986) photographed 30 y earlier. 
Description type:Original description 
Description:Butyriboletus querciregius D. Arora & J.L. Frank, sp. nov. FIG. 3D, E
Medium-sized to large basidiocarps with reddish or yellow-tinged pileus, yellow tube layer that usually turns blue when bruised, yellow reticulate stalk and firm, mild-flavored flesh that may turn blue erratically when exposed. Spores short-fusoid. Fruiting in fall with oaks.
MycoBank MB803211
Holotype: USA, California, Santa Cruz County: near Aptos, 36.96860, 2121.84540, under coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), 31 Oct 2011, Arora11100 (SFSU).
Additional photos: Arora (1986): color plate 133 (as Boletus regius).
Pileus 6-20(25) cm broad, convex becoming broadly convex at maturity or sometimes plane; surface dry or sightly tacky to the touch but not viscid; glabrous or occasionally breaking up to form some small scales; reddish or dull red when young and fresh or yellow overlain with red (i.e. reddish orange overall with more yellow at the margin) or red blotched with yellow but often fading to pale reddish
brown, pinkish tan, yellow or yellowish buff with age or where exposed to light. Context firm, thick, pale yellow, typically unchanging in the button stage but with age usually turning blue at least somewhat when cut; flavor mild.
Hymenophore (tube layer) pale yellow becoming bright yellow and eventually olive yellow or greenish; pore surface usually concolorous with the tubes, typically turning blue quickly when bruised except in the button stage; tubes at first short in relation to the pileus context but 1-2 cm or longer when mature; individual pores typically less than 1 mm broad. Stipe 5215(20) cm long, 2-6 cm thick at the apex, usually clavate or slightly bulbous when young but often more or less equal in age; surface butter yellow to bright yellow throughout or with beautiful red to dark red blushes toward the base, sometimes bruising blue when pressed but variable in this respect; finely reticulate over at least the upper portion, the reticulation yellow or occasionally reddish but often becoming brown after spores are shed. Context firm, pale yellow except for the base, which usually has a distinct vinaceous tinge, turning blue little if at all when cut.
Spores dark olive brown in mass, fusoid, thinwalled, smooth, pale brown or yellowish in KOH, (10)11-15(16) x 3.5-5 µm (Q5 3.0, n = 30). Basidia clavate, four-spored; hymenial cystidia mostly fusoidventricose. Pileus cuticle an interwoven trichodermium with few erect hyphal tips.
Specimens examined: USA, CALIFORNIA: Santa Cruz County, near Aptos under coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), coll. by F. Menge, 31 Oct 2011, Arora11100 (Holotype: SFSU, Isotype: OSC148244). Santa Cruz County, Arora11097 (SFSU), Arora11098 (SFSU, OSC), Arora11099 (SFSU, OSC), Arora11106 (SFSU). Sonoma County, Santa Rosa, Arora12012 (SFSU). WASHINGTON: Klickitat County, 01MWB052012 (OSC.) Occurence: Solitary or in groups in leaf litter under oaks (mainly Q. agrifolia and Q. garryana, less commonly with Q. lobata and other Quercus spp.). It fruits mostly in the fall (Sep-Dec), but the first of the Washington collections listed above was made in May and DA has found it in coastal California in June. It is possible that this species also occurs with tanoak, but such a relationship has not been verified. It is common after early fall rains in the oak woodlands of California, infrequent northward to Washington and possibly British Columbia. We were able to identify an ITS DNA sequence in GenBank (EU018562) of an ectomycorrhizal root tip from
Q. garryana in Oregon as Bu. querciregius (FIG. 1); its basic ectomycorrhizal morphology is tan, monopodial and tortuous (Moser et al. 2009). The distribution and tree host preferences of this species appear to Occurence: Solitary or in groups in leaf litter under oaks (mainly Q. agrifolia and Q. garryana, less commonly with Q. lobata and other Quercus spp.). It fruits mostly in the fall (Sep-Dec), but the first of the Washington collections listed above was made in May and DA has found it in coastal California in June. It is possible that this species also occurs with tanoak, but such a relationship has not been verified. It is common after early fall rains in the oak woodlands of California, infrequent northward to Washington and possibly British Columbia. We were able to identify an ITS DNA sequence in GenBank (EU018562) of an ectomycorrhizal root tip from Q. garryana in Oregon as Bu. querciregius (FIG. 1); its basic ectomycorrhizal morphology is tan, monopodial and tortuous (Moser et al. 2009). The distribution and tree host preferences of this species appear to closely parallel those of the oak-associated population of Boletus barrowsii Thiers & Smith (Arora 2008).

 
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